Posts By: Homer Bartlett

Storing Passwords

Securing Your iCloud Account | Ripple IT

If you follow password security guidelines, you should have a unique password for each online service you use. That way if one service provider does get compromised and some ne’er-do-well in Russia gets your password, he can’t get into all the other online services he might guess that you use. But a study from 2010… Read more »

Adobe Introduces Subscription Licensing

Adobe | Ripple IT

One of the great aspects of cloud computing, or software-as-a-service, is that it scales efficiently (making it a good strategy for operating in tough financial times). Paying per mailbox per month for email hosting, for instance, scales down gracefully when your summer interns go back to school. But if you had an Internal Exchange server… Read more »

Are Managed Services Just Insurance?

Managed IT as Insurance | Ripple IT

When we talk to people about managed services we frequently hear something like this: “So we pay a little each month to ensure that we’re covered when something bad happens, rather than paying a lot when it happens. That’s basically insurance, right?”

Computer Warranties

Computer Warranties | Ripple IT

We always recommend replacing computers every 3 years and maintaining a next business day (“NBD”) onsite repair warranty on them for those 3 years. It’s one of the core principles of successfully delivering managed services and IT support for small business. Why? On average roughly 1 in 5 laptops fail in the first 3 years… Read more »

Best Practices for Computer Life Cycles

Ripple IT is a client of Whiteboard

I met with a new client the other day to deliver an assessment report. At the start of each new client relationship we evaluate their existing IT infrastructure and practices and deliver a report that serves as a baseline, from which we can measure our attempts to improve things. Reviewing the report with the client… Read more »

Windows Can Be User-Friendly, Too

Microsoft Windows | Ripple IT

Microsoft introduced the “Windows Experience Index” in Windows Vista and it continues in Windows 7. A computer’s score on this standard set of performance tests (processor, memory, graphics, and hard drive if you must know) gives you a good idea of how well that computer is going to perform, or how good your computing “experience” is going to be.