Mac and PC Support With Microsoft Office 2011

Supporting Macs and PCs together has lots of challenges. One of the biggest has been that Microsoft email has been so different in each platform. Windows users have Outlook, the de facto standard (albeit not the most elegant), and Mac users have had Entourage – possibly one of the worst software crimes perpetrated on IT… Read more »

Are Managed Services Just Insurance?

When we talk to people about managed services we frequently hear something like this: “So we pay a little each month to ensure that we’re covered when something bad happens, rather than paying a lot when it happens. That’s basically insurance, right?”

Computer Warranties

We always recommend replacing computers every 3 years and maintaining a next business day (“NBD”) onsite repair warranty on them for those 3 years. It’s one of the core principles of successfully delivering managed services and IT support for small business. Why? On average roughly 1 in 5 laptops fail in the first 3 years… Read more »

Best Practices for Computer Life Cycles

I met with a new client the other day to deliver an assessment report. At the start of each new client relationship we evaluate their existing IT infrastructure and practices and deliver a report that serves as a baseline, from which we can measure our attempts to improve things. Reviewing the report with the client… Read more »

Firing Clients

The story about the JetBlue flight attendant who lost it after dealing with a rude passenger reminded me of an article I wrote in 2006. I think it still holds up. Firing Clients Sure. Why not? Seth Godin has a post about people being rude and disrespectful to airline staff. His question is: Should companies… Read more »

Shortchanging Yourself by Not Telling Your Story

We had a sales meeting a few years ago that we knew would be a little rushed, and in the interest of getting through everything we wanted to get through, we shortened our presentation. But we did it the wrong way – we cut out parts of our story. To keep the truth complete, you… Read more »

Mike Landman’s 7 Rules for Job Seekers

You are a product. Your resume and interview are your marketing. And a product has to differentiate itself to have a chance of being noticed and valued. It astonishes me to continually get the same generic resumes, the same attempt to prove diverse skills, and the same generic answers – that I must conclude are coming from the world of resume/interview advice. The prevailing theory seems to be “offend no one, never take your self out of contention.” Imagine that process recruiting for a sports team or a movie cast. Terrible. So I have my rules.